Play! Ball!

Can you guess what was the earliest sport played on the M.A.C. (Maryland Agricultural College) campus in the mid- to late 1800s?

Baseball.  The cadets began playing baseball competitively shortly after the Civil War.  Games were more of the club variety, without a formal squad or schedule. The first record of game action the University Archives has found in the local newspapers comes from the Baltimore Sun of June 7, 1869:

On Saturday last, a friendly match game of base ball was played between the Vernon Club, composed of the students of the Maryland Agricultural College, and the Star Club of Laurel. After a well-contested game, the Vernon was declared the winning club, the score standing–Vernon 61, Star 40. The day was cool and favorable for playing, the sky being overspread with clouds. There was quite a number of ladies and gentlemen present to witness the friendly struggle. The game was called at four o’clock and lasted until seven. S. Brashbears as acted as umpire, and W. Easter and Thomas O’Brian as scorers.

A recent University Archives acquisition challenges this 1869 date. In summer 2016, the Archives purchased a diary from 1865 written by M.A.C. student Charles Berry. Berry described playing “base ball” in his several of his March entries, so it is likely that the game was prevalent on campus even before 1869. You can find more information about Berry’s diary here.

1871-rule-book-coverAnother early indication of the presence of baseball on the M.A.C. campus is the grouping of baseball rule books, dating from 1871 to 1910, found in the mid-1990s among the records of the University of Maryland President’s Office. Although there is no direct proof that these rule books were used at M.A.C., their presence among the president’s files would seem to imply that the cadets were indeed playing baseball at that time.

By 1893, according to the Maryland Agricultural College Bulletin of July 16, 1894, a typical team consisted of the college’s vice president, a math professor, the athletic director, and several students.

Several early players of note deserve special attention:

simon-nicholls-page_cropThe first Terp to play baseball professionally was Simon Nicholls (Class of 1903), who played shortstop for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Athletics, and Cleveland Naps in the early 1900s.

Charlie (King Kong) Keller (Class of 1937) is the only Terp to play in the All-Star game and the World Series to date.

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Charley Keller Day at Yankee Stadium, 1948

H. Burton (Ship) Shipley, baseball and basketball coach to players known as “Shipleymen” for 38 years (1923-1961), was inducted into the Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame. Shipley Field was named in Coach Ship’s honor in 1956.

 

As the Terrapins inaugurate America’s Favorite Pasttime this spring, we celebrate and honor our baseball heritage and recognize the many accomplishments of the men who built the UMD baseball program.

Go Terps! Play! Ball!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Terps – 2002 NCAA Champions

When the Maryland men’s basketball team advanced to the Sweet Sixteen this past spring,

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The iconic cover commemorating the Terps first, and so far only, title for the men’s program.

it marked the program’s second trip to that round since they won the NCAA Championship in the spring of 2002.

That early April moment will live in forever in the memories of Maryland basketball fans as the squad, led by coach Gary Williams and guard Juan Dixon, defeated elite programs Kansas and Indiana in the Final Four en route to cutting down the nets.

When the Terps finally won on (no joke) April 1, 2002, the fans back in College Park exploded with joy. The University of Maryland student paper, The Diamondback, documented both the victory in Atlanta and the celebrations back home.

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The Diamondback put together a collage of moments from the Terps victory in Atlanta.

With a celebratory cover, the newspaper showed the team’s #1 finger and held a strong quote from Terps coach Gary Williams. “Things have never worked out quite right. This year they did,” Williams said. The rest of the paper was full of coverage, including plenty of pictures from the game and the subsequent gatherings on Route 1.

The Diamondback is the university’s primary student 
newspaper, and its coverage of athletics and other campus events provides an invaluable perspective on the university’s history. Thanks to generous donations and a successful Launch UMD campaign, the University Archives is digitizing the entire run of the newspaper, which is currently available on microfilm in the University Archives and McKeldin Library. This post is the part of a series based on information collected during the Diamondback Digitization Project, and is the first blog post written by our new undergraduate student assistant, Josh Schmidt. Check out the riot-pictureTwitter hashtag
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#digiDBK or the DigiDBK tag on Terrapin Tales blog for previous posts. Look out for more DigiDBK posts from Josh and the rest of our team throughout the semester!

Maryland Done a “Dirty Deal”

Ruth Finzel-cropAccording to the diary of 1930’s coed, Ruth Finzel, recently donated to the University of Maryland Archives, the Aggies football team got a “dirty deal” in their loss to the Naval Academy Middies 86 years ago today at Washington’s Griffith Stadium.

The Crab Bowl, as it is presently known, was played on November 22, 1930.  Notable attendees at the game included Charles F. Adams, Secretary of the Navy, Albert E. Ritchie, Maryland Governor, Sir Ronald Lindsay, British Ambassador, and Rear Adm. S.S. Robinson, Naval Academy Superintendent.  By many accounts, the 1930 game proved to be the first competitive contest of the series, with Navy scoring the only points on the second play of the game. The remaining 58 minutes were a defensive struggle

Here’s Ruth’s account of that football showdown:

“Norma, Jake, Morselly, Jane Smith and I went with Ruth Gilbert to the Navy game.  The girls wore chrysanthemums and ribbons to it [sic].  The traffic was terrible and Ruth was driving like wild.  Smacked into someone and nearly upset [sic] another time.  Parked way off.  Lost 6-0 by a dirty deal.  Kennedy came down with me for the last 10 minutes of the game and walked out with me.  He’s so cute.  I told him about my Iota Nu Delta date, so he told me about his.  I’m glad he had a punk time.  Went to bed early.

The dirty deal to which Ruth refers?  Check out the account of the game in The Diamondback: “Byrdmen Beaten by Kirn Plus Ten Men in Annapolis Fracas.  Adverse Decision Turns Possible Triumph into Defeat”

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This was the latest installment of an intense football rivalry  between two institutions close in proximity (30 miles) but many miles apart in cultural and institutional differences.  Play began in 1905, ended abruptly 60 years later, but was renewed in 2005.  Losing the first 8 games, Maryland finally won in 1931, the season after Ruth graduated.  One of the highlights of this long series is the September 30, 1951, game at which Byrd Stadium, now known as Maryland Stadium, was dedicated. The Terps topped the Middies, 35-21, that day, and UMD Heisman Trophy runner-up Jack Scarbath scored the first touchdown in the new stadium. A total of 21 games have been played with an overall record of 14 Navy wins to Maryland’s 7.

Jack Scarbath 1st touchdown in Byrd
Scarbath scores!

Historically, the in-state rivalry was fueled by what some young men perceived as the coeds’ attraction to nattily-attired Midshipmen in their handsome uniforms over the more typical casual appearance and behavior of men on the Maryland campus.  There was also an enduring grudge borne out of a single-finger gesture made by a Maryland linebacker after tackling Navy QB Roger Staubach, during a narrow Maryland victory, 27-22, in 1964.  Consequently, the Maryland-Navy competition was suspended for 40 years by Navy.

Here’s a selection of program covers from some of our contests against the Middies:

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We post this today, on the 86th anniversary of this special day in Ruth’s life, and encourage you to check back for future snapshots of this era in UMD history! You can find her account of the 1930 May Day fun with Zingaree and the Gypsies here.

The “Art” of Football

The search for programs from past football games against our 2016 opponents led us to some of the most colorful and creative sports artwork in our collections.  Renowned 20th-century artists, such as Jack Fagan, Joe Little, and Phil Neel, showcased their unique, humorous talents on the covers of game-day programs. The University of Maryland Archives are fortunate to possess numerous examples of their work. Enjoy their eye appeal, brilliant use of color, and creative, quirky characters.

1961-clemson Cartoon artist Phil Neel (1928-2012) was famous for creating the most recognizable and lovable mascot in college sports, Aubie the Auburn tiger.  Although Aubie was Neel’s most famous creation, he also drew covers for other schools, including Clemson, whose programs featured Neel’s characters from 1959 to 1976. Neel’s drawings became collectors’ items, as seen when Aubie serves up some turtle soup.

1935-indiana Jake Fagan (1910-1993) created this colorful cover for one of our Big Ten opponents this season; the Terps take on Indiana on October 29 in Bloomington. Fagan was best known for his landscape painting and commercial art and served for a time as the art director of the Wells Fargo Bank.

 

 

Joe Little’s football hero evokes gentlemanly courtesy prior to kickoff against Southern Methodist University  and captures the determination of one football hero, with the clock winding down against N.C. State. Little illustrated pulp fiction, magazine stories, and sports programs from the 1940s to the 1960s, specializing in football covers during the 1950s.

Turtle soup is a popular theme, as featured on the October 7, 1950, Maryland vs. Michigan State program drawn by Cahoon. The Terps take on the Spartans this season on October 22.

Another of our historic programs from a contest against a Big Ten opponent is this Dad’s Day beauty drawn by artist Lon Keller. The Terps travel to Happy Valley to take on the Nittany Lions on October 8.1958-south-carolinaOur final, colorful favorite is this gem from the November 1, 1958, Homecoming game vs. South Carolina. Willard Mullin, who described himself as a cartoonist, not an artist, and was known as a keen observer of the human form in action, drew this cover for that special day.

The artists entertained the fans while showcasing athletes, coaches and campuses.  As you can see, the options were endless and entertaining! Art. Football. When they team up on game day, it’s a winning combination!

15 (more!) Hidden Places at UMD

In 2015, we introduced our readers to 20 secret campus locations. Today, we’d like to show you a few more, and we hope that you’ll remember them throughout the semester. UMD has a number of hidden resources that may prove helpful to students as the year progresses. Some places are informational; some just provide a space to relax, reflect, and de-stress!

1. The University Libraries (That’s right! There’s more than just McKeldin!)

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Our campus has 7 libraries dedicated to providing millions of resources to our students.

McKeldin Library features our general collections, covering most subjects of study, as well as the Terrapin Learning Commons for group and late-night study 6 days a week.

We also have several subject-specialized libraries:
Charles E. White Memorial Chemistry LibraryMichelle Smith Performing Arts LibraryEngineering and Physical Sciences LibraryArchitecture LibraryArt Library, Priddy Library at Shady Grove

Keep on the lookout for another post in October about Hornbake Library, our home and our personal favorite resource on campus. This Library hosts Library Media Services, the  Prange Collection and the Maryland Room where patrons access our other Special Collections – all of which are way too cool to pass up!

2. Gem and Mineral Museum in the Geology Building

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Maryland Day Visitors in the Gem and Mineral Museum. Courtesy University of Maryland Geology Department Facebook Page.

Tucked away in the Geology Building is a wealth of minerals and gemstones for your viewing pleasure. You don’t need to be a Geology student to visit, and at the right time of day, you might be able to ask someone to tell you more about the different objects and gems. The quality of the specimens in the museum’s collection is often compared to the Smithsonian!

3. Norton-Brown Herbarium

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Sample specimen from the digital collections of the Norton-Brown Herbarium

The Norton-Brown Herbarium (Herbarium code MARY) was established in 1901 and is administered by the Department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture in the College of Agricultural and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland, College Park. MARY’s natural heritage collection contains the largest number of Maryland-native specimens and includes approximately 87,000 specimens of various plant types from all over the world. The website for the herbarium hosts a searchable index of the collection and tons of digital images of the many different plant types.

4. The Campus Farm

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View of the Campus Farm, photo taken by John T. Consoli

The Campus Farm is a daily reminder of our heritage as a land-grant university and serves as an important study center for animal science students interested in large animals. Though the buildings currently used on our farm were not built until 1938 and 1949, the farm has been a long-standing presence on our campus. Recently, the campus farm,  home of the campus equestrian team, saw the birth of new foals for the first time in many years. The farm is one of the biggest centers of activity on Maryland Day, when visitors can see demonstrations by the equestrian team and a cow with a port-hole, known as a fistula, into its stomach…

Currently, the campus farm is raising money for a massive revitalization project of the barns and other buildings. It hopes to raise $6 million to turn the farm into a “teaching facility for the future.”

5. Earthen Bee Wall

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On North Campus, near the Apiary building and Maryland Stadium, stands a new habitat “to raise public awareness of wild pollinators and to facilitate monitoring of campus bee populations.” As many studies have recently shown, wild bee populations are dwindling across the country and, as much as we might fear them, we need bees to continue to enjoy a lot of the luxuries we hold dear. This habitat is designed to revitalize our campus bee population and to encourage further research on wild pollinators in other parts of the country as well!

6. Peace and Friendship Garden at University House

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Veteran Chinese artist Han Meilin designed “Diversity in Unity” to serve as a physical reminder of the growing bond between the University of Maryland and China. Meilin’s design is a Peace Tree which stands approximately 5 meters tall and serves as the focal point of the University’s peace garden on the vista of the University House. Meilin was inspired by Chinese-style gardens, which often incorporate asymmetry, art, stone, water, various colors and textures, and a variety of plant materials. The Peace Garden is open for visitors throughout the day and is an excellent place to indulge in a little inner peace without leaving campus.

7. Memorial Garden for 9/11

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Peace Garden, Main Admin. Burial site for flowers from 9/11 memorial service. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

A few weeks ago, we wrote about September 11, 2001, and its effect on the campus community. Following the memorial service on McKeldin Mall on September 12, 2001, flowers from that ceremony were buried at the foot of the mall, near Main Admin, and turned into a memorial.

 

 

 

8. Climbing Wall at Eppley Recreation Center

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Courtesy of http://www.uniquevenues.com

Ever feel stressed during the semester? Exercise and physical activity are always a good way to deal with stress in a healthy and productive manner. RecWell provides numerous facilities and activities for our community – but the climbing wall , located just behind the ERC, is one of the most exciting. Take a break to practice a new physical skill and have fun at the same time.

9. Secret Subway and Taco Bell in Glenn L. Martin Hall

Imagine it – you’re starving in between a class in Math and another class in the Martin building. You’ve only got about 30 minutes, and Stamp seems like a mile away. Have no fear! There’s a Subway and a super-secret Taco Bell tucked away in between Martin and Kirwan Hall, which sometimes only seem to be found when you’re not looking for them…

10. Turtle Topiary outside of the Benjamin Building

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Topiary Testudo, outside Benjamin Building and across from Cole Field House, 2008. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

Just across from the Benjamin Building and Cole Field House sits a Topiary Testudo – a sculpture made to allow a plant to grow around it and take its shape. As the hedge grows, the turtle becomes less metal-structure and more plant-like. This testudo arrived as a gift from the class of 2004.

 

 

 

11. Research Greenhouse Complex

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The greenhouses behind Terrapin Trail Garage are a state-of-the-art facility for research on plant life. These structures replaced the Harrison Labs along Route 1, now the site of The Hotel, and the original greenhouses behind the Rossborough Inn. The greenhouses, along with the campus farm and the Norton-Brown Herbarium, help us stay in touch with our roots as the Maryland Agricultural College.

12. The David C. Driskell Center  for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora

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“Emancipating the Past”: Kara Walker’s Tales of Slavery and Power, on display from February to May 2015

The Driskell Center honors the legacy of David C. Driskell – Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art – by preserving the rich heritage of African American visual art and culture. Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, museum professionals, art administrators, and scholars, who are interested in broadening the field of African Diasporic studies. The Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting African American art as well as replenishing and expanding the field. Each semester the center features exhibits that showcase African American visual art and culture. This semester’s exhibition, “Willie Cole: On Site” will be hosted from September 22nd to November 18th.

13. Courtyard behind the Clarice

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Ever catch yourself in need of a nice, quiet place to study, relax, or just sit and think? The Clarice’s courtyard is the perfect outdoor study space. At any time, you can enjoy the weather, read, take notes, chat with a friend, all while listening to the various music rehearsals taking place around the building. The courtyard can also be reserved for an outdoor reception or celebration.

14. Dessie M. and James R. Moxley, Jr., Gardens at Riggs Alumni Center

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Moxley Gardens, in the courtyard at the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, is home to some of campus’ most relaxing spaces. The garden uses red, yellow, and white to represent our school pride – which is fitting, since the gardens sit right across Maryland Stadium’s main gate. While a number of events are hosted at the Riggs Center and in the gardens throughout the year, students and visitors are welcome to enjoy the garden any time the gates are open. It’s a wonderful place to study, chat, or just sit and relax – and it’s much less crowded than trying to enjoy the ODK fountain on McKeldin Mall!

15. Golf Course and Driving Range

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Hole 18 at the University golf course features its very own, “M”! Courtesy terpgolf.umd.edu

The University of Maryland’s Golf Course opened on May 15, 1959. There was immense student interest in having an accessible, affordable course, as well as adequate facilities in order to teach students to play. Since its opening, players have enjoyed the course’s combination of “challenge and playability,” as well as its landscaping, which keeps the course tucked away from the hustle and bustle of our busy city. The course was renovated and updated in 2008-2009 and has since been named one of Golfweek magazine’s top 25 campus courses several times. Famous golfer Jack Nicklaus even played a round there in 1971. If you visit, be sure to have lunch at Mulligan’s – one of the best-kept food secrets on campus!

If you have any other hidden places on campus that you like to frequent, let us know in the comments below.

Terps vs. the Ivies

If you asked the first 100 fans you meet in Maryland Stadium “Did the Terps ever take on an Ivy League team on the gridiron,” probably the vast majority would respond, “No.” They would be surprised to learn that Maryland did indeed face off with Yale, Princeton, and Penn a total of 18 times, beginning in 1919 with a game against the Yale Bulldogs.

Terps’ losses far outnumbered their wins–vs. Yale (2-8-1), Princeton (0-2) and Pennsylvania (1-4). Their most lopsided loss came against Penn, 51-0, in the 1940 match-up.  The last time Maryland played against an Ivy League team was in 1941, losing again to Penn, 55-6. Terps have never taken on Columbia, Brown, Cornell or Dartmouth.

Continue reading “Terps vs. the Ivies”

The Cadets’ Review

cadets-review-title-page-vol-3-no-5The Cadets’ Review is just one of thousands of unique pieces of history held in the University Archives at the University of Maryland. Now fully digitized and available online, The Cadets’ Review is a twelve-issue, small-format newspaper written and published by Maryland Agricultural College students and faculty from February 1894 to March 1896. This newspaper was one of the main predecessors to The Diamondback, today’s independent, student-run newspaper which began as The Triangle in 1910. Columns in this early newspaper covered all aspects of student life, including current events, athletics, military business, humor, and even suggestions to get involved in Glee Club.

One of our favorite columns written comes from the March 1895 issue. “Some Curious Old Laws of Maryland” discusses the bizarre, early-Maryland codification of laws. For example, because tobacco held monetary value, criminals were fined in pounds of harvested tobacco.

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Using explicit language was another punishable offense in early Maryland– a law that would be frequently broken today.

 

 

may-1894-well-read-individualsAnother one of our favorite columns appears in the May 1894 issue. “Wasted Hours,”authored by S.T. Rollins, calculates the exact amount of time needed to become “well-read individuals.”

If you devote an hour of your time each day to reading the digitized version The Cadets’ Review via the University Archives website, you can learn a lot about what life was like for cadets early on in our university’s history.

Check out other fully digitized resources from the Archives if you are interested in learning more about additional student publications, course catalogs, UMD athletic guides, the Greek community yearbook The Frieze, Major League Baseball Rulebooks, or University AlbUM. Come visit us in the Maryland Room too, which is open Monday-Friday and on Sunday afternoons. Here you can work with documents and artifacts from the University Archives. We can’t wait to see you in Hornbake Library!

Celebrating 100 years of women’s education at UMD

September 14 is a landmark day in University of Maryland history! One hundred years ago today, a young woman named Elizabeth Gambrill Hook entered the Maryland State College of Agriculture, as the University of Maryland was then known, setting the stage for the over 17,000 female students currently on campus.  The 20-year-old Hook indicated an interest in experimental work in her entrance register entry and fulfilled her dream by earning her degree in entomology in 1920, becoming the first woman to take all of her classes on campus and receive a four-year degree.

Charlotte Ann Vaux joined Elizabeth Hook on campus a few weeks later. Vaux took a two-year course in agriculture and received her degree in 1918.

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Charlotte Vaux’s entry in the 1918 Reveille yearbook.

These two pioneers and other early women at Maryland are featured in a new University Archives exhibit on the first and second floors of McKeldin Library. The display chronicles the academic, athletic, and social activities of early co-eds, and also features information on the rules of behavior that female students were expected to follow. Visitors can learn more about Misses Hook and Vaux, the first sorority and women’s sports teams at Maryland, the May Day tradition, and restrictions on women’s movements around campus, guests in the dormitory, and even use of musical instruments and typewriters. The exhibit also contains examples of academic expectations for the pioneering co-eds and the story of early early rebel, Vivian Simpson.

Coeds100YearsPoster_1st floor“We Take our Hats off to you, Miss(es) Co-eds: Celebrating 100 Years of Women’s Education at Maryland” will remain on display outside of the Footnotes Café on the first floor and in the Portico Lounge on the second floor of McKeldin through mid-January 2017. Stop by and learn more about these amazing women from 100 years ago!

This is a post in our series on Terrapin Tales called UMD123! Similar to our “ABC’s of UMD” series in fall 2015, posts in this series will take a look at the university’s history “by the numbers.” New posts will come out twice a month throughout the fall; on the Terrapin Tales blog, search “UMD123” or use the UMD123 tag. You can also check out Twitter#UMD123. If you want to learn more about campus history, you can also visit our encyclopedia University of Maryland A to Z: MAC to Millennium for more UMD facts.

 

 

The Diamondback’s First Sports Section

In honor of this month’s Summer Olympiad in Rio, we  are excited to feature the first Diamondback Sports section! While The Diamondback and its predecessors discussed our student athletes’ prowess from the inception of the student newspaper in 1910, the first section specifically marked Sports did not appear until February 10, 1936.

Did you know UMD once had a boxing team (now it’s a club sport)? The first sports section mentioned relay, tumbling acrobatics, basketball, boxing, volleyball, and other intramural activities. We hope you enjoy the words “cageman,” “ringster” (both meaning boxer), “hardwooder” and “basketer” (both meaning basketball player).

Now, back to the Olympics!

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Our level of excitement for Team USA!  [Pictured:Team USA after the 2008 Beijing Gold Medal soccer match vs. Brazil (Source)]
The Diamondback is the university’s primary student newspaper, and its coverage of athletics provides an invaluable perspective on the university’s history. Thanks to generous donations and a successful Launch UMD campaign, the University Archives is digitizing the entire run of the newspaper, which is currently available on microfilm in the University Archives and McKeldin Library. This post is the twelfth in a series by graduate student assistant Jen Wachtel, who is collecting data for the Diamondback Digitization Project. Check out the Twitter hashtag #digiDBK or the DigiDBK tag on Terrapin Tales blog for previous posts. Look for regular posts again in the fall!

UMD123: 5

Thousands of athletes have graced this campus and led UMD athletics to new heights throughout the years. Among these thousands, 46 individuals proudly represented not only the University of Maryland, but their home countries in the Olympic Games. Out of those 46, FIVE athletes achieved the prized gold medal!

Arthur Cook

In 1948, the kingpin rifle shooter of the world was none other than Arthur E. Cook, Class of 1950, better known as “Cookie.” As the “baby” of the shooting team representing the U.S. at the Olympics in London, Cookie was found astonishing for his age and his performance was a great upset to the competition. He won the 50-meter competition with an unbelievable score of 599 out of a possible 600, earning him the gold medal!  He was the rifle team captain while attending the University of Maryland’s College of Engineering.

Steve Sheppard with medal 2

A dominate force on the basketball court, Steve “Bear” Sheppard jumped at the opportunity to play with the USA men’s basketball team in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. Sheppard would help Team USA go undefeated through the tournament and crush Yugoslavia, 95-74, for the gold medal! Returning to UMD, Sheppard finished out his collegiate career with many highlights before becoming the second round pick for the Chicago Bulls in 1977-78.

universityofmar1988univ_0_001As a tremendous, aggressive defensive star, Victoria “Vicky” Bullett was the youngest member (age 20) of the U.S women’s basketball team at the 1988 Summer Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea.  Vicky scored four points to help Team USA defeat Yugoslavia (77-70) for the gold medal! On her return from South Korea, Vicky stated that, “I’m in a daze, it still hasn’t really hit me yet. It was a great experience, very exciting.”¹ Vicky Bullett graduated from Maryland in 1989 with a degree in General Studies.

Andrew Valmon

The current head coach of Maryland Track and Field, Andrew Valmon, is no stranger to the Olympics. As a young runner, Andrew attended the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, and the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. In his first appearance at the Olympics, he assisted in winning the gold medal for the Men’s 4 x 400 meter relay with a final time of 2:56.17 just missing the 1968 Olympic and World Record.  At the next Summer Games (1992), Andrew once again assisted the Men’s 4 x 400 meter relay in capturing the gold and setting a new world record of 22:55.74.  In 2003, Andrew was named head coach of Maryland’s Track and Field team. He reached the highest level of his coaching career when he was named the head coach of the U.S Track & Field Team for the 2012 London Olympics.

fpo-dominique-dawesAt the young age of six, Dominique Dawes began a long and successful career as a gymnast.  Twelve years later after numerous competitions and already an Olympic veteran (competing in the 1992 Olympics), she once again proved her ability by gaining a position on the U.S. women’s gymnastics team for the 1996  Summer Olympics in Atlanta. By the end of the games, the team earned the nickname “Magnificent Seven” and became the first U.S. women’s gymnastics team in Olympic history to win a gold medal. Dawes would later graduate from University of Maryland (though never a member of UMD Gymnastics) in 2002 and is currently a co-chair of the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition while working for Yahoo Weekend News.²

This is a post in our on-going series on Terrapin Tales called UMD123! Similar to our “ABC’s of UMD” series in the fall 2015 semester, posts in this series will take a look at the university’s history “by the numbers.” New posts will come out twice a month; on the Terrapin Tales blog search “UMD123” or use the UMD123 tag. You can also check out Twitter #UMD123. If you want to learn more about campus history, you can also visit our encyclopedia University of Maryland A to Z: MAC to Millennium for more UMD facts.

¹ Quote taken from UMD Diamondback article in September 1988 issue.

² Information sourced from Dominique Dawes Wikipedia page. Photo used from Bio section on President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition website.