20 Performers who Rocked UMD

In a letter to the Diamondback in 1969, a disgruntled student complained that other students “don’t know what they’re missing” in the music scene. Other universities hosted big-name bands like Jefferson Airplane, so why not UMD? Someone must have taken his advice because our campus exploded with music, from underground cult bands to big-name artists playing to sold out crowds. Scroll on for our list of 20 epic performers who rocked the UMD campus.

1. Elvis Presley – September 27 & 28, 1974

elvis-performs

How could The King be anything but number 1? Although perhaps not his best years, Elvis still played to sold-out crowds in not one, but two shows in Cole Field House.

2. Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis & Bruce Springsteen – April 28, 1973

Chuck Berry                     bruce

Believe it or not, The Boss was barely mentioned in the advertisements for this epic collaboration. Springsteen was still years from commercial success, but established rockers Berry and Lewis kept the crowds going until after midnight. So hyped was the show that several students were arrested for sneaking in through an open bathroom window.

3. Queen with Thin Lizzy – February 4, 1977

In a show heavy on special effects and skintight leotards, rockers Queen and Thin Lizzy lit up a crowd of 10,000 at Cole Field House, shutting it down with an encore performance of Elvis’ “Jailhouse Rock.”

Queen

4. Stevie Wonder with Mandrill, Earth, Wind & Fire, and The Persuasions – March 25, 1973

stevie

 

Yet another historic musical collaboration hit the stage when Stevie Wonder came to town for this soul showdown. The six-hour-long show ended with his latest single, “Superstition,” although we are equally as impressed that UMD offered unlimited free parking for attendees.

5. U2 – April 25, 1983

U2 had yet to hit it big in the United States when they landed in College Park.

U2 review

Before the days of metal detectors and bag checks, enthusiastic concert-goers climbed on stage to dance with the band and Bono rode on a fan’s shoulders through the crowd.

6. Frank Zappa – various dates

frank zappa                Zappa letter

The Baltimore-born rocker played on campus at least five times between 1967 and 1978. After one such stay, several members of Zappa’s team skipped town without paying their hotel bill in full, so the owner of the local Holiday Inn sent a letter demanding payment to Zappa’s production company.

7. Billy Joel – April 30, 1977

BIlly Joel Steve Martin

It’s hard to imagine paying just $6.50 to see an artist who sells out stadiums for $300+ per seat today. The Piano Man just so happened to perform the same week as an up-and-coming comedian… look familiar?

8. The Clash – September 29, 1979

The Clash review

 

The gnarly British punk band almost (literally) blew out the sound system of Ritchie Coliseum. Despite technical delays and a restless crowd, The Clash destroyed their set list – and several guitars – to the delight of the sweaty, jam-packed audience.

 

9. Santana – October 19, 1974

Santana 2

Santana 5

As the title of the Diamondback article suggests, Carlos Santana was the focal point of his eponymous band’s nearly 3-hour-long set. The crowd of over 8,000 clapped and roared with frenetic energy through the popular hit songs and epic guitar solos.

10. The Grateful Dead – March 7, 1981

Grateful Dead review

 

“Deadhead” students started lining up the week before ticket sales started to score seats for this long-anticipated concert. University officials, desperate to clear the Student Union of the throngs of un-showered hopefuls, decided to sell tickets before the band’s contract had even been signed.

11. The Beach Boys – March 28, 1972

Beach Boys 2

 

The Boys may have been past their prime by 1972, but they proved their timeless appeal by drawing thousands to Cole Fieldhouse after the release of their 17th (!) album, Surf’s Up.

 

12. Ozzy Osbourne – February 14, 1983

Ozzy 2                  Ozzy security 3

The Prince of Darkness returned to UMD for a Valentine’s Day solo show after performing with Black Sabbath in 1972. A police report written by the University police expresses their concern of potential unrest due to Ozzy’s “abuse of animals… involvement with satanic groups, and desecration of monuments.”

13. The B-52s – September 11, 1980

B-52s 3

The B-52s rode the wave of their newfound fame to college campuses all over the country after topping the charts with their first hit single, “Rock Lobster.”

14. The Ramones – July 14, 1981

Ramones 4

 

One consistent thread throughout many Diamondback concert reviews is complaints about the terrible acoustics in Ritchie Coliseum. The Ramones were able to bop their way past the technical difficulties to jam through all of their biggest hits.

 

15. Rod Stewart with Faces – October 11, 1975

Rod Stewart 4

As one reviewer wrote, Stewart took the stage in satin pants and sang until his voice gave out, accompanied by guitarist Ronnie Wood (who soon moved onto the band he is most associated with today, the Rolling Stones).

16. Blue Oyster Cult – October 22, 1972

Blue Oyster Cult poster

 

UMD didn’t know it yet, but what it really needed in 1972 was more cowbell. Poor ticket sales actually led to a huge loss of money for the university, most likely because the crowd did not yet know that you Don’t Fear the Reaper.

 

17. Cyndi Lauper – May 3, 1984

Lauper took home the Grammy for Best New Artist soon after she brought her quirky brand of fun to Ritchie Coliseum.

Cyndi Lauper 2

The post-show “security report” noted that there were no incidents… despite Lauper’s late arrival.

18. Devo – November 2, 1981

Devo review

 

True to their quirky style, Devo’s performance was packed with flashing lights, video backdrops, and moving sidewalks. The crowd in Ritchie danced through the synthesizer-fueled “Whip It,” the song that cemented Devo as a cult favorite.

 

19. Steppenwolf ft. Don McLean – March 26, 1971

The Steppenwolf concert gains a spot for the sheer “rock n roll” factor of how it all went down. The Diamondback reported that disgruntled fans were arrested after turning violent and throwing rocks at policemen. The unrest threatened the future of student events on campus, as admins debated whether to invite rock musicians at all.

clipping.jpg

McLean, a little known musician at the time, was just a few months from releasing his hit song “American Pie.” His return to campus in 1973 drew a much higher turnout. Check out our previous blog post for more on the event.

20. The Talking Heads – October 13, 1978

Talking Heads 3

Rock music gave way to a tide of New Wave groups as the ’80s approached. Lead singer David Byrne grew up in Baltimore and returned home on one of The Talking Heads’ first national tours.

The Shows That Never Were

bob

As on any big campus, UMD has its fair share of “shows that got away.” Campus legends tell of the promising acts that never materialized – like the Rolling Stones and a Springsteen solo show. Perhaps most tragically, a much-anticipated and sold-out concert by Bob Marley was cancelled at the last minute when the singer grew ill. He was sadly never able to reschedule due to his failing health.

Still, this list is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to campus concert history. The University Archives holds the records of Student Entertainment Events (SEE); come in and see what other famous musicians you can find in our archives!

 

Advertisements

235 year-old gift to UMD

A very special piece of the UMD Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives turns 235 years old in 2016–the grandfather clock that stands outside the Maryland Room on the first floor of Hornbake Library.

Alma clock_crop 2Wyke and Green, clockmakers in Liverpool, England, constructed this beautiful timepiece in 1781. How it reached the United States is unknown. Charles Sink, horologist and owner of the Antique Clock & Watch Shop in Ellicott City, MD, cleaned and restored the inner workings of this piece in 2008. Retired UMD Libraries’ staff member Roy Alvarez covered the expenses for Sink’s work in honor of his parents, Hugh and Emilie Alvarez, and faithfully winds the clock each week. During your visits to Hornbake, you can hear the beautiful chimes when the clock strikes the hour.

Why would such an unusual and historic piece have a home in the library? The clock is a gift in memory of former Registrar Alma Preinkert, who was tragically murdered in her home on February 28, 1954, one of the university’s unsolved mysteries.

Alma Preinkert from 1954 yrbk_cropMiss Preinkert, a much-beloved campus figure, earned an M.A. degree from Maryland as served as assistant registrar and registrar for nearly 30 years. On that fateful night, a burglar broke into the Washington, DC, home Preinkert shared with her sister and began ransacking the bedrooms. The commotion awakened Miss Preinkert, and she attempted to stop the man, aided by her sister, Alvina, who also awoke during the struggle. The burglar stabbed Alma Preinkert 11 times before fleeing, and her sister was wounded as well. Alvina survived, but Alma’s wounds were fateful. Despite an intensive search for the burglar, during which police questioned 2,500 men and detained multiple suspects, and the offer of $1500 in reward money, the perpetrator was never captured, and this case remains a UMD unsolved mystery.

The University Archives has numerous newspaper clippings about Alma Preinkert’s murder and recently obtained a copy of the DC Police report and reward flyer to add to the file. Stop by the Archives and check it out, if you want to learn more about the case.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Miss Preinkert’s death saddened many across the campus, and classes were cancelled so students could attend her funeral on March 3, the first one ever held in Memorial Chapel, which had  been dedicated only 15 months earlier. So many people wished to attend the service that the Chapel was filled to capacity, and the overflow of students, faculty, and staff stood outside in the rain to listen to the proceedings.

To memorialize Miss Preinkert, the Maryland Federation of Women’s Clubs and a group of her friends of donated the clock in 1958, four years after the Board of Regents renamed the Women’s Fieldhouse in her honor.

The next time you are in Hornbake, plan to arrive near the hour so you can hear the delicate chimes as the clock strikes and visit the unusual and historic memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Digital Material: Historic Campus Maps Added to AlbUM

In recent weeks, nearly 100 maps of campus from throughout our 160-year history have been added to the University Archives’ online image repository, University AlbUM.

Have you ever wanted to see how our lovely old campus has changed since 1856? Now you can! Even if you just want to see what might’ve changed during your own years as a student, or since your parents’ day, or whatever – it’s all here!

Let’s take a look at the two oldest maps. Trust us, it’ll blow your mind.

18561906

1856-1906
For some perspective, the “Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station” is the Rossborough Inn. It stands on the map exactly where it exists today. Campus was centered south of that location, right about where Morrill Hall and LeFrak stand today. Did you notice there were only 10 buildings on campus?

1856-1916

1856-1916
This map, dated circa 1916, features the same center area of campus. It explains which buildings burned in the Great Fire of 1912, and outlines the new building locations. That circle with all the lines coming from it? That’s the point of failure – yes, THAT point of failure between Shoemaker and LeFrak – and marks where the fire started. The mechanical engineering building and annex are now called Taliaferro Hall.

1941

1941
In the late 1930s-early 1940s, campus started to take its more familiar shape. This map, dated 1941, is the first time we see the full extent and beauty of what would come to be known as McKeldin Mall. Originally the mall extended from Main Administration all the way up to Anne Arundel Hall. The Armory still isn’t in the right place yet, but we’re getting closer!

Check out the slideshow of other fun campus maps below. If you’re interested in seeing them all, head over to University AlbUM! Feel free to look around, and see what else we have while you’re there. (We’ve got some awesome old football film online too!)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Gridiron Memories

The University Archives recently acquired an exciting new piece of Terrapin football history: the program from the Maryland vs. Michigan State game on October 7, 1950.

MD vs Michigan State_fball_1950_crop

This 34-7 drubbing is the only triumph over the Spartans to date and was a landmark victory for head coach Jim Tatum in his fourth season at the helm.

Here’s a full account of the game from the 1951 Terrapin yearbook:

MD vs Michigan State_1951 yrbk_p282

We are excited to have the program to add to the Archives to commemorate this very special moment in B1G Terrapin football history! Stop by Hornbake Library and check out the other programs in our collection, dating back to 1923.