Visit New Football Exhibit

Calling all Terps fans! A new exhibit in Hornbake Library’s Maryland Room features a selection of photos, programs, pennants, uniforms, and more from the University Archives’ collections commemorating the football team’s 125th year. From the team’s humble beginning in 1892 to today, our Maryland Terrapins have created many memorable moments including 11 conference championships, 27 […]

via New exhibit celebrates 125 years of Maryland football — Special Collections and University Archives at UMD

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Terps Publish!

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The University Archives is involved in an exciting new project–Terps Publish! Designed to promote student publishing at UMD, this event will bring together student editors and writers from publications across the campus for a discussion of publishing issues and a recruitment fair showcasing current publications.

Sustaining a student publication over the long term takes more than energy and hard work. It requires an understanding of electronic platforms, technical standards, and best practices. Terps Publish will connect student publishers who may face similar challenges to share their expertise and address common concerns during the roundtable portion of the program. This conversation will be followed by an opportunity for the various publications represented to display their work and talk with students interested in joining their staffs as writers or editors.

Terps Publish will be held on Tuesday, April 11, from 2 to 5 PM in Room 2109 in McKeldin Library. The roundtable will run from 2 to 3:30, followed by the recruitment fair from 3:30 to 5 PM. Representatives of student publications interested in participating are encouraged to register  by March 31 at http://www.lib.umd.edu/terps-publish/2017 , especially if they wish to have a table at the recruitment fair.

Terps Publish is being spearheaded by Kate Dohe, Manager of Digital Projects and Initiatives for the UMD Libraries; Kate started a similar project, Hoyas Publish, at Georgetown University before joining the staff at Maryland in 2016. Other members of the planning group for the event include Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Eric Bartheld, Director of Communications for the UMD Libraries, Anne Turkos, University of Maryland Archivist, and student representatives from StylusPowerlines, and the Left Bench blog. Turkos is particularly excited to participate, since Terps Publish will help the University Archives reach out to new student publications to encourage them to send copies of their work to the Archives and will help strengthen the relationship the Archives has with publications already represented in the Archives’ collections.

Please join us for Terps Publish on April 11, 2-5 PM. For more information about this event visit the Terps Publish website or email terpspublish@umd.edu. Hope you will be able to stop by McKeldin Library for this very special event!

“A Date Which Will Live in Infamy”

On this the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, we remember all the brave members of the University of Maryland community who gave their lives in the service of their country during World War II and highlight resources in the UMD Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives that support study of that conflict.

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Dr. Gordon W. Prange in his office in the UMD History Dept.

The personal papers of Gordon W. Prange are one of the most frequently consulted collections in the UMD Archives. Dr. Prange (July 16, 1910 – May 15, 1980) was an historian and history professor at the University of Maryland from 1937 until his death in 1980. While teaching at Maryland, Prange published many books and articles on a variety of historical topics, but he is probably best known for his research on the attack on Pearl Harbor. Prange conducted interviews and collected accounts from diaries, articles, and correspondence with many of the key participants in the battle, both Japanese and American, as well as completing extensive research on the causes, planning, build-up to, execution, and consequences of the attack. The collection consists of both personal and professional papers and includes unpublished manuscripts, correspondence, interview notes and transcripts, research notes, articles, maps, and photographs related to Prange’s research on the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Midway, the Russian spy Richard Sorge, and the speeches of Adolf Hitler. There are also materials related to Prange’s tenure as a history professor at the University of Maryland and his service as an historian for the US Army under General Douglas MacArthur during the Allied occupation of Japan.

 

The Prange Papers were most recently used by NHK Television in Japan for a documentary on the life of Mitsuo Fuchida, the pilot who led the first airstrike against Pearl Harbor. This video aired on TV in Japan in August 2016; an English version of the same piece ran on PBS in Hawai’i two days ago.

The Gordon W. Prange Collection on the Allied Occupation of Japan, 1945-1949, an internationally known resource documenting life in post-war Japan, is named in Dr. Prange’s honor.

A selection of additional, World War II-related resources in the University of Maryland Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives may be found in this subject guide: http://digital.lib.umd.edu/archivesum/rguide/wwii.jsp.

The University Archives’ Scrapbook Collection also includes a volume presented to the Alumni Association following the war, which includes a collection of newspaper clippings about University of Maryland alumni who fought in the war. Colonel John O’Neill, University of Maryland class of 1930, is the subject of several pages, with articles detailing his recommendation for a Distinguished Service Cross. In addition to the large collection of clippings about Maryland alumni in the armed services, there are numerous obituaries and notices of those missing-in-action. Similar coverage of Maryland students and alumni serving in the war can be found in the alumni magazines of the period, accessible via links on http://www.lib.umd.edu/univarchives/alumni-magazines, and in issues of The Diamondback, currently available on microfilm and soon to be accessible online.

The University Archives is also proud to preserve the University of Maryland Memorial Book, which contains a Roll of Honor listing the names of University of Maryland alumni who were killed in action in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. The book was engraved by White House calligrapher and 1943 Maryland graduate William E. Tolley, and was dedicated at a service in Memorial Chapel on November 19, 1961. You may find the entirety of this moving tribute to these brave members of the campus community online at http://hdl.handle.net/1903.1/5024.

For more information about the resources described here, contact the University Archives at askhornbake@umd.edu or 301-405-9058.

Student Life in the 1870s–new acquisition

“As a general thing we have stale bread, butter & meat (beef) that is hardly fit to eat, for breakfast.” So reported Maryland Agricultural College student Percy Davidson in a March 6, 1871, letter home to his mother, recently donated to the UMD Archives. Some things never change–like college students complaining about the food in the dining hall…

Davidson’s comment and a number of other interesting observations really capture what life was like at the Agricultural College in the early 1870s. He reports on student dress, his daily study routine, and his efforts to avoid “boys that I think would injure my good morals.” Davidson also asks his mother to send some “eatibles,” another necktie for Sundays, and a pair of slippers and comments on previous news from home.

Such early student commentary is rare, so this brief letter is especially valuable, and the UMD Archives is delighted to add this gem to its collections.

Try your hand at reading the letter. If you struggle a bit, the transcription appears below.

You can also stop by the Archives during our open hours and see the letter in person. Hope you will pop in soon.

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Md. Agrl. College

Feb. March 6, 1871

My Dear Mamma

I received your letter a few moments ago I hasten to answer it.

I have two neckties but one is hardly fit for use & I should like very much to have another one for Sundays.

Papa told me when he was out here that I was looking badly & attributes it to want of exercise, but I think the reason is that we never get a change of diet, we have the same thing over & over again, & sometimes dont [sic] get enough of what we do have. It is a very rare thing for the butter or vegetables to pass around. As a general thing we have stale bread, butter & meat (beef) that is hardly fit to eat, for breakfast.

As I do not drink tea or coffee Mrs. Regester gives me a glass of milk for breakfast & supper.

We have supper at 5 o’clock & the bell rings at 6 to study. I study until about 9 1/2 or 10, but I never stay up later unless I have a harder lesson than usual to study, but since Dr. Regester has stopped us from using lamps or candles after the bell rings to go to bed I never stay up later than 10.

Boys hardly ever congregate in my room especially bad boys. I never voluntarily associate with boys that I think would injure my good morals.

I hope I have answered your questions satisfactorily for I have told you nothing but the plain truth, Mamma.

I would like very much to have the eatibles that you mentioned & also some hard-tack & anything at all that would be the most convenient for you to get, but please don’t put yourself to any extra trouble for me, for I expect my visit home will compensate for anything that I dont [sic] get out here.

I would like to have a pair of slippers to put on in the morning when I get up  & at night while I am studying.

Most of the boys out here have got them.

Sister told me in one of her letters that you had a tremendous Newfoundland but she didn’t tell me its name or anything about it. Has sister got her little dog still. Tell Papa I received my suit of clothes a few days ago & they fit me splendidly. I have now got good suits of clothes including my uniform. I am glad to hear that Frankie talks & maybe he will send me a message soon.

I hope when you move you will be able to get a better house than the one which you now occupy for I know you are tired of being all cramped up.

Hoping to be with you soon & anticipating a happy meeting I remain your devoted son

Percy Davidson

 

 

 

15 (more!) Hidden Places at UMD

In 2015, we introduced our readers to 20 secret campus locations. Today, we’d like to show you a few more, and we hope that you’ll remember them throughout the semester. UMD has a number of hidden resources that may prove helpful to students as the year progresses. Some places are informational; some just provide a space to relax, reflect, and de-stress!

1. The University Libraries (That’s right! There’s more than just McKeldin!)

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Our campus has 7 libraries dedicated to providing millions of resources to our students.

McKeldin Library features our general collections, covering most subjects of study, as well as the Terrapin Learning Commons for group and late-night study 6 days a week.

We also have several subject-specialized libraries:
Charles E. White Memorial Chemistry LibraryMichelle Smith Performing Arts LibraryEngineering and Physical Sciences LibraryArchitecture LibraryArt Library, Priddy Library at Shady Grove

Keep on the lookout for another post in October about Hornbake Library, our home and our personal favorite resource on campus. This Library hosts Library Media Services, the  Prange Collection and the Maryland Room where patrons access our other Special Collections – all of which are way too cool to pass up!

2. Gem and Mineral Museum in the Geology Building

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Maryland Day Visitors in the Gem and Mineral Museum. Courtesy University of Maryland Geology Department Facebook Page.

Tucked away in the Geology Building is a wealth of minerals and gemstones for your viewing pleasure. You don’t need to be a Geology student to visit, and at the right time of day, you might be able to ask someone to tell you more about the different objects and gems. The quality of the specimens in the museum’s collection is often compared to the Smithsonian!

3. Norton-Brown Herbarium

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Sample specimen from the digital collections of the Norton-Brown Herbarium

The Norton-Brown Herbarium (Herbarium code MARY) was established in 1901 and is administered by the Department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture in the College of Agricultural and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland, College Park. MARY’s natural heritage collection contains the largest number of Maryland-native specimens and includes approximately 87,000 specimens of various plant types from all over the world. The website for the herbarium hosts a searchable index of the collection and tons of digital images of the many different plant types.

4. The Campus Farm

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View of the Campus Farm, photo taken by John T. Consoli

The Campus Farm is a daily reminder of our heritage as a land-grant university and serves as an important study center for animal science students interested in large animals. Though the buildings currently used on our farm were not built until 1938 and 1949, the farm has been a long-standing presence on our campus. Recently, the campus farm,  home of the campus equestrian team, saw the birth of new foals for the first time in many years. The farm is one of the biggest centers of activity on Maryland Day, when visitors can see demonstrations by the equestrian team and a cow with a port-hole, known as a fistula, into its stomach…

Currently, the campus farm is raising money for a massive revitalization project of the barns and other buildings. It hopes to raise $6 million to turn the farm into a “teaching facility for the future.”

5. Earthen Bee Wall

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On North Campus, near the Apiary building and Maryland Stadium, stands a new habitat “to raise public awareness of wild pollinators and to facilitate monitoring of campus bee populations.” As many studies have recently shown, wild bee populations are dwindling across the country and, as much as we might fear them, we need bees to continue to enjoy a lot of the luxuries we hold dear. This habitat is designed to revitalize our campus bee population and to encourage further research on wild pollinators in other parts of the country as well!

6. Peace and Friendship Garden at University House

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Veteran Chinese artist Han Meilin designed “Diversity in Unity” to serve as a physical reminder of the growing bond between the University of Maryland and China. Meilin’s design is a Peace Tree which stands approximately 5 meters tall and serves as the focal point of the University’s peace garden on the vista of the University House. Meilin was inspired by Chinese-style gardens, which often incorporate asymmetry, art, stone, water, various colors and textures, and a variety of plant materials. The Peace Garden is open for visitors throughout the day and is an excellent place to indulge in a little inner peace without leaving campus.

7. Memorial Garden for 9/11

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Peace Garden, Main Admin. Burial site for flowers from 9/11 memorial service. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

A few weeks ago, we wrote about September 11, 2001, and its effect on the campus community. Following the memorial service on McKeldin Mall on September 12, 2001, flowers from that ceremony were buried at the foot of the mall, near Main Admin, and turned into a memorial.

 

 

 

8. Climbing Wall at Eppley Recreation Center

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Courtesy of http://www.uniquevenues.com

Ever feel stressed during the semester? Exercise and physical activity are always a good way to deal with stress in a healthy and productive manner. RecWell provides numerous facilities and activities for our community – but the climbing wall , located just behind the ERC, is one of the most exciting. Take a break to practice a new physical skill and have fun at the same time.

9. Secret Subway and Taco Bell in Glenn L. Martin Hall

Imagine it – you’re starving in between a class in Math and another class in the Martin building. You’ve only got about 30 minutes, and Stamp seems like a mile away. Have no fear! There’s a Subway and a super-secret Taco Bell tucked away in between Martin and Kirwan Hall, which sometimes only seem to be found when you’re not looking for them…

10. Turtle Topiary outside of the Benjamin Building

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Topiary Testudo, outside Benjamin Building and across from Cole Field House, 2008. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

Just across from the Benjamin Building and Cole Field House sits a Topiary Testudo – a sculpture made to allow a plant to grow around it and take its shape. As the hedge grows, the turtle becomes less metal-structure and more plant-like. This testudo arrived as a gift from the class of 2004.

 

 

 

11. Research Greenhouse Complex

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The greenhouses behind Terrapin Trail Garage are a state-of-the-art facility for research on plant life. These structures replaced the Harrison Labs along Route 1, now the site of The Hotel, and the original greenhouses behind the Rossborough Inn. The greenhouses, along with the campus farm and the Norton-Brown Herbarium, help us stay in touch with our roots as the Maryland Agricultural College.

12. The David C. Driskell Center  for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora

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“Emancipating the Past”: Kara Walker’s Tales of Slavery and Power, on display from February to May 2015

The Driskell Center honors the legacy of David C. Driskell – Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art – by preserving the rich heritage of African American visual art and culture. Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, museum professionals, art administrators, and scholars, who are interested in broadening the field of African Diasporic studies. The Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting African American art as well as replenishing and expanding the field. Each semester the center features exhibits that showcase African American visual art and culture. This semester’s exhibition, “Willie Cole: On Site” will be hosted from September 22nd to November 18th.

13. Courtyard behind the Clarice

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Ever catch yourself in need of a nice, quiet place to study, relax, or just sit and think? The Clarice’s courtyard is the perfect outdoor study space. At any time, you can enjoy the weather, read, take notes, chat with a friend, all while listening to the various music rehearsals taking place around the building. The courtyard can also be reserved for an outdoor reception or celebration.

14. Dessie M. and James R. Moxley, Jr., Gardens at Riggs Alumni Center

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Moxley Gardens, in the courtyard at the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, is home to some of campus’ most relaxing spaces. The garden uses red, yellow, and white to represent our school pride – which is fitting, since the gardens sit right across Maryland Stadium’s main gate. While a number of events are hosted at the Riggs Center and in the gardens throughout the year, students and visitors are welcome to enjoy the garden any time the gates are open. It’s a wonderful place to study, chat, or just sit and relax – and it’s much less crowded than trying to enjoy the ODK fountain on McKeldin Mall!

15. Golf Course and Driving Range

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Hole 18 at the University golf course features its very own, “M”! Courtesy terpgolf.umd.edu

The University of Maryland’s Golf Course opened on May 15, 1959. There was immense student interest in having an accessible, affordable course, as well as adequate facilities in order to teach students to play. Since its opening, players have enjoyed the course’s combination of “challenge and playability,” as well as its landscaping, which keeps the course tucked away from the hustle and bustle of our busy city. The course was renovated and updated in 2008-2009 and has since been named one of Golfweek magazine’s top 25 campus courses several times. Famous golfer Jack Nicklaus even played a round there in 1971. If you visit, be sure to have lunch at Mulligan’s – one of the best-kept food secrets on campus!

If you have any other hidden places on campus that you like to frequent, let us know in the comments below.

A Nostalgic Walk through McKeldin Library

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Testudo checking out books at McKeldin Library, c.2003.

Can you remember the last time you checked out a book from McKeldin Library?  Like the red stamps on your call slip, each trip to McKeldin marks a moment in time. As a campus institution, McKeldin Library witnesses the individual growth of so many Terps in one way or another.

Most of us come to the library out of necessity: cramming for finals together on sleepless nights or grabbing that quick coffee minutes before lecture. In the rush of our busy lives as students and educators, how often do we connect these moments to our university’s broader legacy?

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McKeldin Library service desk, c. March 1958.

The University officially dedicated McKeldin Library 58 years ago today. In celebration of this formative moment, we invite you to turn the pages of the building’s history in a nostalgic look at its origins.  As you flip through the slideshow below and the official dedication program, we encourage you to think about how these spaces have grown into your own vision of McKeldin Library. Enjoy!

 

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Election Memorabilia on Campus

Primary season is in full gear as we approach the November general election! Do you collect campaign buttons or posters? How about hats with your candidate’s face on the top? As you keep abreast of the twist and turns of this year’s campaigns, take a look at the memorabilia that McKeldin Library displayed ahead of the 1968 election. That year, University graduate student Dale E. Wagner’s collection traveled to the Democratic and Republican conventions before making its way back to McKeldin Library.

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Photo of Dale E. Wagner with his memorabilia by Howard Lalos

The Diamondback reported that Wagner’s buttons, ribbons, posters, and mementos dated back to the election of 1840 (William Henry Harrison vs. Martin Van Buren). McKeldin Library’s exhibit also featured recordings of famous speeches by presidents such as Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and John F. Kennedy. As the article notes, the humorous, often satirical 1968 campaign buttons quickly drew the attention of “the non-history major.” What are some of your favorites from the 1968 campaign (see below)?

 

 

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The most controversial item: Article author Tom Basham writes that the average reaction to the We Love Mayor Daley (former Democratic mayor of Chicago) sign is “What the hell is that thing doing in there?” Photo by Howard Lalos.

The Diamondback is the university’s primary student newspaper and records the voice of the student body. The University Archives has embarked on a digitization project to make articles like this one (see below) accessible online for future enjoyment and research. Thanks to generous donations and a successful Launch UMD initiative, the University Archives is on track to make all of these articles available and searchable in 2016. This post is the sixth in a series by graduate student assistant Jen Wachtel is collecting data for the project. Check out the Twitter hashtag #digiDBK or the DigiDBK tag on the blog for previous posts. Don’t forget to check out the current University Archives display honoring the 70th anniversary of Gymkana on the first floor of McKeldin Library by the elevator and in the Portico Lounge on the second floor!

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Diamondback Reporting on Famous Visitors

Members of the University of Maryland community know that the campus often invites world-famous people to campus, from writers (e.g. Ralph Ellison, author of The Invisible Man, in 1974) to queens (Queen Elizabeth II in 1957). These visitors often draw large crowds and facilitate campus dialogue, and The Diamondback, as the primary student newspaper on campus, provides invaluable insights into these historic campus visits.

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Gus Grissom addresses students

Fifty-two years ago, on March 10, 1964, in the midst of the Space Race, the university invited NASA astronaut Gus Grissom to campus to speak to students. Grissom outlined the Gemini program, which we now know as NASA’s second human spaceflight program, and hinted at plans for the renowned Apollo program’s lunar landings. The Diamondback reported that during the question and answer session, however, students forced Grissom to defend the value of the space program and contrast the U.S. program with that of the Russians. This is just one instance of The Diamondback providing a student perspective of the campus climate and culture.

Here’s a teaser for an upcoming post about another famous person featured in The Diamondback:  Next month, look for a post about a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts who delivered the 1959 convocation address.

Thanks to a successful Launch UMD campaign, the University Archives is in the process of digitizing the entire run of The Diamondback, from 1910 to the present. Graduate Student Assistant Jen Wachtel, who is collecting data for the digitization project, has now collected over 70 years’ worth of Diamondback data from the microfilm reels available in the Maryland Room! Stay tuned to Terrapin Tales for updates on her discoveries and the Diamondback Digitization project. This post is the fourth in a series – check out the Twitter hashtag #digiDBK and search for #digiDBK on the Terrapin Tales blog for the first three blog posts.

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Astronauts (left to right) Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee perished in a fire on the launchpad during Apollo 1 testing on April 27, 1967 — only a few years after Grissom hinted at the Apollo program at UMD. This photograph was taken ten days before the fatal fire. Image source: NASA (public domain)

Enjoy your Spring Break and check back again in two weeks!