Take a Walk Down Route 1

Cutting along the eastern edge of UMD’s campus, Route 1 is a familiar site and busy thoroughfare for students. Students roaming the sidewalks of Route 1 have immediate access to food, shopping, and housing. But that’s not all the highway has been used for over the years. Check out these changes to Route 1!

Route 1

Farmers walk oxen down Route 1 near the Rossborough Inn, 1900.

This rural scene shows what Route 1 and College Park were like before the road became a bustling, paved main street. With the rise in popularity of the automobile, traffic on the road increased, and the state mandated that the road be paved in 1904. Officially designated “State Route No. 1,” the College Park segment of the road wasn’t paved until 1910.

Route 2

Dairy cows crossing Route 1, 1933.

Widened and added to the official US highway system in 1926, Route 1 connects the country from Maine to Florida. But even as the road expanded, the sections around College Park remained rural. Cows and other livestock were frequently seen crossing the highway in the 1930s!

The growth of the University of Maryland drastically and rapidly changed the character of Route 1 in College Park. As the university expanded, businesses congregated along its waysides to cater to students. Stoplights were added, and the road was widened again in the 1940s to accommodate increased traffic. Below you can see the lit signs of businesses and the large number of cars parked along Route 1 in College Park after World War II.

Route 4

Route 1 at night, 1949.

In the 1970s, Route 1 became a site of protest. In 1970, UMD students blocked this busy thoroughfare during protests against the escalation of Vietnam War into Laos and Cambodia. Similar scenes occurred again in 1971 and 1972. The National Guard was called to campus three times in three years.

Route 5.png

Student protesters congregate on Route 1, 1970.

Today UMD students continue to have a deep appreciation for Route 1. In 2010, an alum named her online clothing company Route 1 Apparel. The company sells Maryland state pride and Maryland-themed clothing. Additionally, many of students’ favorite hangout spots are in Route 1’s many restaurants, bars, and coffee shops.

Route 3

Route 1 at night, 2018. Photo credit: Washington Post

More changes are on the way for US highway 1. The street will intersect with WMATA’s new Purple Line that is scheduled to open in 2022, and new businesses continue to spring up along the street.

From cows to light rail transit, Route 1 has seen it all!

 

 

 

Advertisements

May is National Strawberry Month!

The Maryland Agricultural College has a very interesting connection to the delicious fruit celebrated each year during the month of May! When Benjamin Hallowell, the college’s first president, arrived on campus in October 1859, one of the first projects he initiated with the young men under his charge was the creation of a strawberry bed.

hallowell
Benjamin Hallowell

Hallowell recounts this story in his autobiography, originally published in 1884:

The students were told if they would plant an acre of land in strawberry vines, and divide the plat into two equal parts, they might take their choice of the portions and have all the strawberries that grew on it, subject to such regulations among themselves as they chose to adopt, the other division being for the family. They accepted this proposition with the greatest alacrity, went at it by turns in the classes with earnestness and under competent direction; and like the ice-pond [another project Hallowell began early on in his presidency], it was completed to the perfect satisfaction of all the parties concerned.

The University of Maryland continues to have close ties to the world of strawberries. For example, UMD Extension agents provide farmers across the state with advice on maximizing and improving their strawberry crops, and researchers in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources have even discovered a gene that may greatly increase strawberry production: https://agnr.umd.edu/news/umd-researchers-find-gene-may-greatly-increase-strawberry-production. Perhaps, as they work, they are remembering those cadets from long ago and those very first strawberry beds here in College Park!

Happy eating!

Cadets_Class of 1890

 

15 (more!) Hidden Places at UMD

In 2015, we introduced our readers to 20 secret campus locations. Today, we’d like to show you a few more, and we hope that you’ll remember them throughout the semester. UMD has a number of hidden resources that may prove helpful to students as the year progresses. Some places are informational; some just provide a space to relax, reflect, and de-stress!

1. The University Libraries (That’s right! There’s more than just McKeldin!)

liblogo

Our campus has 7 libraries dedicated to providing millions of resources to our students.

McKeldin Library features our general collections, covering most subjects of study, as well as the Terrapin Learning Commons for group and late-night study 6 days a week.

We also have several subject-specialized libraries:
Charles E. White Memorial Chemistry LibraryMichelle Smith Performing Arts LibraryEngineering and Physical Sciences LibraryArchitecture LibraryArt Library, Priddy Library at Shady Grove

Keep on the lookout for another post in October about Hornbake Library, our home and our personal favorite resource on campus. This Library hosts Library Media Services, the  Prange Collection and the Maryland Room where patrons access our other Special Collections – all of which are way too cool to pass up!

2. Gem and Mineral Museum in the Geology Building

13123075_1033006213456972_3835446985781096731_o
Maryland Day Visitors in the Gem and Mineral Museum. Courtesy University of Maryland Geology Department Facebook Page.

Tucked away in the Geology Building is a wealth of minerals and gemstones for your viewing pleasure. You don’t need to be a Geology student to visit, and at the right time of day, you might be able to ask someone to tell you more about the different objects and gems. The quality of the specimens in the museum’s collection is often compared to the Smithsonian!

3. Norton-Brown Herbarium

mary18543
Sample specimen from the digital collections of the Norton-Brown Herbarium

The Norton-Brown Herbarium (Herbarium code MARY) was established in 1901 and is administered by the Department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture in the College of Agricultural and Natural Resources at the University of Maryland, College Park. MARY’s natural heritage collection contains the largest number of Maryland-native specimens and includes approximately 87,000 specimens of various plant types from all over the world. The website for the herbarium hosts a searchable index of the collection and tons of digital images of the many different plant types.

4. The Campus Farm

Farm_02232012_0581
View of the Campus Farm, photo taken by John T. Consoli

The Campus Farm is a daily reminder of our heritage as a land-grant university and serves as an important study center for animal science students interested in large animals. Though the buildings currently used on our farm were not built until 1938 and 1949, the farm has been a long-standing presence on our campus. Recently, the campus farm,  home of the campus equestrian team, saw the birth of new foals for the first time in many years. The farm is one of the biggest centers of activity on Maryland Day, when visitors can see demonstrations by the equestrian team and a cow with a port-hole, known as a fistula, into its stomach…

Currently, the campus farm is raising money for a massive revitalization project of the barns and other buildings. It hopes to raise $6 million to turn the farm into a “teaching facility for the future.”

5. Earthen Bee Wall

cob-bee-habitat-wall

On North Campus, near the Apiary building and Maryland Stadium, stands a new habitat “to raise public awareness of wild pollinators and to facilitate monitoring of campus bee populations.” As many studies have recently shown, wild bee populations are dwindling across the country and, as much as we might fear them, we need bees to continue to enjoy a lot of the luxuries we hold dear. This habitat is designed to revitalize our campus bee population and to encourage further research on wild pollinators in other parts of the country as well!

6. Peace and Friendship Garden at University House

peacegardenleftimage

Veteran Chinese artist Han Meilin designed “Diversity in Unity” to serve as a physical reminder of the growing bond between the University of Maryland and China. Meilin’s design is a Peace Tree which stands approximately 5 meters tall and serves as the focal point of the University’s peace garden on the vista of the University House. Meilin was inspired by Chinese-style gardens, which often incorporate asymmetry, art, stone, water, various colors and textures, and a variety of plant materials. The Peace Garden is open for visitors throughout the day and is an excellent place to indulge in a little inner peace without leaving campus.

7. Memorial Garden for 9/11

9/12 Memorial. Shot 9/11/2008
Peace Garden, Main Admin. Burial site for flowers from 9/11 memorial service. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

A few weeks ago, we wrote about September 11, 2001, and its effect on the campus community. Following the memorial service on McKeldin Mall on September 12, 2001, flowers from that ceremony were buried at the foot of the mall, near Main Admin, and turned into a memorial.

 

 

 

8. Climbing Wall at Eppley Recreation Center

2univmaryland
Courtesy of http://www.uniquevenues.com

Ever feel stressed during the semester? Exercise and physical activity are always a good way to deal with stress in a healthy and productive manner. RecWell provides numerous facilities and activities for our community – but the climbing wall , located just behind the ERC, is one of the most exciting. Take a break to practice a new physical skill and have fun at the same time.

9. Secret Subway and Taco Bell in Glenn L. Martin Hall

Imagine it – you’re starving in between a class in Math and another class in the Martin building. You’ve only got about 30 minutes, and Stamp seems like a mile away. Have no fear! There’s a Subway and a super-secret Taco Bell tucked away in between Martin and Kirwan Hall, which sometimes only seem to be found when you’re not looking for them…

10. Turtle Topiary outside of the Benjamin Building

TopiaryTestudo_08252008_06
Topiary Testudo, outside Benjamin Building and across from Cole Field House, 2008. Photo by John T. Consoli.

 

 

Just across from the Benjamin Building and Cole Field House sits a Topiary Testudo – a sculpture made to allow a plant to grow around it and take its shape. As the hedge grows, the turtle becomes less metal-structure and more plant-like. This testudo arrived as a gift from the class of 2004.

 

 

 

11. Research Greenhouse Complex

remsberg_12081747635

The greenhouses behind Terrapin Trail Garage are a state-of-the-art facility for research on plant life. These structures replaced the Harrison Labs along Route 1, now the site of The Hotel, and the original greenhouses behind the Rossborough Inn. The greenhouses, along with the campus farm and the Norton-Brown Herbarium, help us stay in touch with our roots as the Maryland Agricultural College.

12. The David C. Driskell Center  for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora

driskell-center-6.web_.jpg
“Emancipating the Past”: Kara Walker’s Tales of Slavery and Power, on display from February to May 2015

The Driskell Center honors the legacy of David C. Driskell – Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art – by preserving the rich heritage of African American visual art and culture. Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, museum professionals, art administrators, and scholars, who are interested in broadening the field of African Diasporic studies. The Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting African American art as well as replenishing and expanding the field. Each semester the center features exhibits that showcase African American visual art and culture. This semester’s exhibition, “Willie Cole: On Site” will be hosted from September 22nd to November 18th.

13. Courtyard behind the Clarice

main-courtyard

Ever catch yourself in need of a nice, quiet place to study, relax, or just sit and think? The Clarice’s courtyard is the perfect outdoor study space. At any time, you can enjoy the weather, read, take notes, chat with a friend, all while listening to the various music rehearsals taking place around the building. The courtyard can also be reserved for an outdoor reception or celebration.

14. Dessie M. and James R. Moxley, Jr., Gardens at Riggs Alumni Center

moxleygarden

Moxley Gardens, in the courtyard at the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, is home to some of campus’ most relaxing spaces. The garden uses red, yellow, and white to represent our school pride – which is fitting, since the gardens sit right across Maryland Stadium’s main gate. While a number of events are hosted at the Riggs Center and in the gardens throughout the year, students and visitors are welcome to enjoy the garden any time the gates are open. It’s a wonderful place to study, chat, or just sit and relax – and it’s much less crowded than trying to enjoy the ODK fountain on McKeldin Mall!

15. Golf Course and Driving Range

hole_18_template
Hole 18 at the University golf course features its very own, “M”! Courtesy terpgolf.umd.edu

The University of Maryland’s Golf Course opened on May 15, 1959. There was immense student interest in having an accessible, affordable course, as well as adequate facilities in order to teach students to play. Since its opening, players have enjoyed the course’s combination of “challenge and playability,” as well as its landscaping, which keeps the course tucked away from the hustle and bustle of our busy city. The course was renovated and updated in 2008-2009 and has since been named one of Golfweek magazine’s top 25 campus courses several times. Famous golfer Jack Nicklaus even played a round there in 1971. If you visit, be sure to have lunch at Mulligan’s – one of the best-kept food secrets on campus!

If you have any other hidden places on campus that you like to frequent, let us know in the comments below.

UMD123: 33

Thirty-three represents the number of previous presidents of the University of Maryland

Since its founding in 1856, the present-day University of Maryland, College Park, has operated under three different monikers and numerous forms of administration, but one thing has remained constant: a single person has been tasked with running the show. Dr. Wallace Loh heads just the 34th administration to guide the university, and our UMD123 number today recognizes the 33 men to hold the job (however temporarily) before him.

Presidents of the Maryland Agricultural College

calvert
Charles Benedict Calvert

The university was first chartered in 1856 as the Maryland Agricultural College on land that was part of the Riversdale estate of Charles Benedict Calvert. Classes began in 1859 with 34 students, including four of Calvert’s sons.

  1. Benjamin Hallowell, 1859 – President for one month. A Quaker who only took the job on the condition that slave labor not be used on the college farm.
  2. Charles Benedict Calvert, acting, 1859-60 – Our founder took the reins himself temporarily until a suitable replacement could be found.
  3. John Work Scott, 1860 – Elected president, but may never have even stepped foot on campus!
  4. John M. Colby, 1860-61 – Saw enrollment rise but then fall sharply with the approach of the Civil War.
  5. Henry Onderdonk, 1861-1864 – Forced to resign amidst accusations that he willingly harbored and feted Confederate soldiers under the command of General Bradley Johnson on their way to the assault of Fort Stevens in the capital.
  6. Nicholas B. Worthington, acting, 1864-1867 – A journalist and professor, he sold almost half of the original campus to meet outstanding debts. As a result of the college’s bankruptcy and the Maryland General Assembly’s decision to designate it a Morrill Land Grant institution, the State of Maryland takes a partial ownership stake in the college for the first time.
lee
George Washington Custis Lee
  1. George Washington Custis Lee, 1866 – The son of Confederate general Robert E. Lee and descendant of Martha Washington, he was offered the position of president but eventually declined due to his loyalty to the Virginia Military Institute and opposition from the Maryland legislature
  2. Charles L. C. Minor, 1867-1868 – Another former Confederate officer, Minor had only 16 pupils when classes opened in 1867.
  3. Franklin Buchanan, 1868-1869 – Yet another former rebel, Buchanan was the first Superintendent of the Naval Academy in Annapolis before serving as the highest-ranking admiral in the Confederate Navy.
  4. Samuel Regester, 1869-1873 – A Methodist minister, Regester eliminated the Bachelor of Science degree and implemented rigid religious discipline.
  5. Samuel Jones, 1873-1875 – After a brief respite, the college once again elected a Confederate officer as president. Former Major General Samuel Jones greatly expanded the curriculum and shifted the focus away from agriculture and towards military training.
Cadets_Class of 1890
Cadets, Class of 1890
  1. William H. Parker, 1875-1882 – Parker saw service in the Civil War as a captain in the: _________ (you guessed it), Confederate Navy! He continued Jones’ unpopular focus on militarism until the state legislature pressured him to resign by threatening to withhold funding.
  2. Augustine J. Smith, 1883-1887 – A commercial agent for a manufacturing firm, Smith sought to build connections between the college and farmers throughout the state.
  3. James L. Bryan, 1887 – Head of schools in Dorchester county, Bryan declined the job after visiting campus.
  4. Allen Dodge, acting, 1887-1888 – A school trustee, Dodge filled in after Bryan turned down the presidency.
  5. Henry E. Alvord, 1888-1892 – In a shocking break with MAC presidential tradition, Alvord was a former major in the Union army. He shifted in the opposite direction of some previous administrations, choosing to focus the school’s efforts almost exclusively on agriculture
silvester
Richard W. Silvester
  1. Richard W. Silvester, 1892-1912 – The school’s first long-term president, Silvester served for two decades until a devastating fire the night of November 29, 1912, burned down two major buildings campus. Already in poor health and now faced with the enormous challenges of re-opening the college, Silvester resigned shortly after the conflagration.

Barracks burning, November 29, 1912

  1. Thomas H. Spence, acting, 1912-1913 – A professor of languages, Spence oversaw the construction of temporary buildings and dormitories as the college struggled to resume operations.
  2. Harry J. Patterson, 1913-1917 – The once-and-future director of the Agricultural Experiment Station (housed at the Rossborough Inn), which was unaffected by the fire), Patterson presided over the transfer of the college to full state control in 1916. H.J. Patterson Hall was later named in his honor.

Continue reading “UMD123: 33”

UMD123: 15,148

This is a post in our new series on Terrapin Tales called UMD123! Similar to our “ABC’s of UMD” series last semester, posts in this series will take a look at the university’s history “by the numbers.” New posts will come out twice a month, on Wednesdays, throughout the semester; search “UMD123” or check out Twitter #UMD123 to see the rest. If you want to learn more about campus history, you can also visit our encyclopedia University of Maryland A to Z: MAC to Millennium for more UMD facts.

So… 15,148 what? Your first thought was “the number of undergraduates currently enrolled,” wasn’t it? Nope! That number is even higher. What about the number of parking spaces? Pft, if only.

If you remember back to last semester’s series on the ABCs of UMD, we talked about the Willow Oaks on campus. This number is related. There are (really, truly) 15,148 “botanical assets” on our beautiful campus, including trees, shrubs, herbs, and other plants. In fact, there’s so much plant life that our campus became the UMD Arboretum & Botanical Garden in 2008.

Plant Life in the Maryland Agricultural College
Our foundation as the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856 and our designation as a Land Grant university in 1865 speak to our university’s long-standing dedication to agriculture and plant life. Our founder, Charles Benedict Calvert, considered botany as one of several important studies which would play a part in the students’ “scientific and practical agriculture” education, when he outlined his vision for the college in a letter dated September 29, 1858, to businessman James C. Nicholson of Baltimore. The growing of fruits and vegetables was also a crucial part of the early curriculum at the MAC. Within five years, the horticulture department was described as teaching “practically all the nicer and finer operations of gardening, which do not generally receive much attention on the farms.” President William H. Parker, our 12th president, noted in 1877 that the college had 12 acres dedicated to “garden stuff.”

Cadets planting tree on Arbor Day

Cadets often planted trees for Arbor Day and were required to work the fields on campus multiple times a week.

Development of Horticulture Curriculum at Maryland
As the years passed, horticulture became even more central to the developing educational programs of the university. The first degree in Horticulture was awarded by the Maryland Agricultural College in 1907 to Guy W. Firor. The first master’s and doctoral degrees were not awarded until 1923 and 1925, respectively. The program continued to develop throughout the 20th century, eventually adding a curriculum in Horticultural Therapy. This curriculum was composed of classes across multiple disciplines, including physical therapy, psychology, and even anthropology, alongside the horticulture requirements. Landscape Design was introduced to the department in the early 1980s, and a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture was added in 1993. The first master’s students were admitted to Landscape Architecture in 2008.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Throughout its history, Maryland has never lost its connection to agriculture and plant life, as clearly reflected in the 15,148 botanical specimen we now boast on campus. Our continued dedication to beautiful gardens and plant life is exhibited in the work that the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, alongside Facilities Management, does on the maintenance and development of the Arboretum and Botanical Garden in order to continue this legacy. Their excellent work has resulted in our campus being named a Tree Campus USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation, and we are in pursuit of the award this year for the eighth time.

Garden with pink flowers by Consoli
Garden along McKeldin Mall. Photo by John T. Consoli.

ABC’s of UMD: Letter R

R is for ROSSBOROUGH INN!

The Rossborough Inn, located on Route 1 next to Chapel Field and across the street from Ritchie Coliseum, is the oldest building on campus, although it has been extensively renovated. The inn was built between 1802 and 1814 and has had many uses over the last 200-plus years. It originally served as a resting place for travelers journeying along the turnpike between Baltimore and Washington. It became the headquarters for the Agricultural Experiment Station at the station’s establishment in 1888 and was also used as faculty and student housing and a faculty/staff club. The building now serves as offices for Undergraduate Admissions staff.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Keep an eye on our social media tomorrow, HALLOWEEN, for our final post about Spooky UMD, featuring the Rossborough Inn!

This is the 18th post in our series on Terrapin Tales called ABC’s of UMD! Posts will come out twice a week, on Mondays and Fridays, throughout the semester. If you want to learn more about campus history, check back weekly to see what we’ve picked to highlight, and you can also visit our encyclopedia University of Maryland A to Z: MAC to Millennium for more UMD facts.

Do you have other ABC’s about campus? Let us know in the comments below!

Check back on Monday, November 2, for Letter S!

A Guide to Good Corn, c. 1908

As we begin to say goodbye to the longer days of summer, we thought it a good opportunity to look back at UMD’s agricultural heritage and a guide to one of summer’s staples, corn.

Prior to becoming the University of Maryland in 1920, Maryland Agricultural College leadership worked diligently to promote and study the crops of Maryland, and corn received its share of attention.  Indeed, corn was one of the focuses of an agricultural exhibit staged by the state (with the participation of the college) at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, informally known as the St. Louis World’s Fair.

In the image below, you see a guide to selecting good corn, written by MAC and UMD agriculture professor W.T.L. Taliaferro, and published in the state’s Farmer’s Institute programs for 1908-1909.

"Expert Criticism of Ear, 1908-1909." UMD Special Collections and University Archives, Farmers Institute publications, UPUB F10.
“Expert Criticism of Ear, 1908-1909.” UMD Special Collections and University Archives, Farmers Institute publications, UPUB F10.

Taliaferro ably served the university for 45 years, retiring only when a new state law forced him to at the age of 80 in 1937.  Taliaferro is pictured below with Agriculture Department Chair and former MAC president Harry J. Patterson, who also fell subject to the same mandatory retirement law that year.  Taliaferro passed away in College Park in 1941 at the age of 84.

UMD Agriculture Department Faculty, 1936. 1936 Reveille yearbook, page 42.
UMD Agriculture Department Faculty, 1936. 1936 Reveille yearbook, page 42.